A Mutual Addiction

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  1. A wonderful, quick read… But with more  feeling in what is beautifully unsaid than what is said.

    A wonderful, quick read… But with more feeling in what is beautifully unsaid than what is said.

     
     
  2. A brutal story, but at the same time a bit contrived, a bit too fantastical… Even as it was drenched in conventionality. Not my favorite Roth novel. It seemed less raw, less personal than others. It lacked Roth’s usual, mesmerizing nakedness, except in very small doses. I’m not sure the protagonist was believable. In any case, it was less believable than his others. This strangeness may have been a result of the half-framed nature of the story— readers lose the narrator early on, but are they expected to forget that the entire remainder is only in his imagination?

    A brutal story, but at the same time a bit contrived, a bit too fantastical… Even as it was drenched in conventionality. Not my favorite Roth novel. It seemed less raw, less personal than others. It lacked Roth’s usual, mesmerizing nakedness, except in very small doses. I’m not sure the protagonist was believable. In any case, it was less believable than his others. This strangeness may have been a result of the half-framed nature of the story— readers lose the narrator early on, but are they expected to forget that the entire remainder is only in his imagination?

     
     
  3. This reassured me of Salinger’s ability to write a great character. It is honest to the point of cruelty, pretentious and extravagant but completely self-aware, acknowledging its own flaws in a way that strikes me as incredibly human.

    This reassured me of Salinger’s ability to write a great character. It is honest to the point of cruelty, pretentious and extravagant but completely self-aware, acknowledging its own flaws in a way that strikes me as incredibly human.

     
     
  4. Lovely lovely lovely

    Lovely lovely lovely

     
     
  5. An important read to check off the list. Interesting, sure, boundary-pushing. I can’t say I got much out of it, or enjoyed it particularly. Maybe a sense of feminism is more important to my appreciation of things than I realize.

    An important read to check off the list. Interesting, sure, boundary-pushing. I can’t say I got much out of it, or enjoyed it particularly. Maybe a sense of feminism is more important to my appreciation of things than I realize.

     
     
  6. This sucked. I had a vague appreciation for The Road, but Huneven was right about McCarthy and his idealization of a world without women. His unrealistic understanding of them, his unwillingness to deal with the reality of them. The sex, the drugs, the greed, the brutality might all be beautiful under someone else’s pen. I just really hated this screenplay. It was the closest thing I could find to something decent to read at El Pratt terminal 2.

    This sucked. I had a vague appreciation for The Road, but Huneven was right about McCarthy and his idealization of a world without women. His unrealistic understanding of them, his unwillingness to deal with the reality of them. The sex, the drugs, the greed, the brutality might all be beautiful under someone else’s pen. I just really hated this screenplay. It was the closest thing I could find to something decent to read at El Pratt terminal 2.

     
     
  7. He really knows how to break my heart. From every perspective. To make me care. There are no flat characters. He is such a lovely storyteller.

    He really knows how to break my heart. From every perspective. To make me care. There are no flat characters. He is such a lovely storyteller.

     
     
  8. She really has it. But not together.

    She really has it. But not together.

     
     
  9. 0 plays
    Cults
    Were Before
    Static
     
     
  10. I.

    O WHAT can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
    Alone and palely loitering?
    The sedge has wither’d from the lake,
    And no birds sing.

    II.

    O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms!
    So haggard and so woe-begone?
    The squirrel’s granary is full,
    And the harvest’s done.

    III.

    I see a lily on thy brow
    With anguish moist and fever dew,
    And on thy cheeks a fading rose
    Fast withereth too.

    IV.

    I met a lady in the meads,
    Full beautiful—a faery’s child,
    Her hair was long, her foot was light,
    And her eyes were wild.

    V.

    I made a garland for her head,
    And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
    She look’d at me as she did love,
    And made sweet moan.

    VI.

    I set her on my pacing steed,
    And nothing else saw all day long,
    For sidelong would she bend, and sing
    A faery’s song.

    VII.

    She found me roots of relish sweet,
    And honey wild, and manna dew,
    And sure in language strange she said—
    “I love thee true.”

    VIII.

    She took me to her elfin grot,
    And there she wept, and sigh’d fill sore,
    And there I shut her wild wild eyes
    With kisses four.

    IX.

    And there she lulled me asleep,
    And there I dream’d—Ah! woe betide!
    The latest dream I ever dream’d
    On the cold hill’s side.

    X.

    I saw pale kings and princes too,
    Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
    They cried—“La Belle Dame sans Merci
    Hath thee in thrall!”

    XI.

    I saw their starved lips in the gloam,
    With horrid warning gaped wide,
    And I awoke and found me here,
    On the cold hill’s side.

    XII.

    And this is why I sojourn here,
    Alone and palely loitering,
    Though the sedge is wither’d from the lake,
    And no birds sing.

     
     
  11. 5,363 plays
    Bad Books
    Pyotr
    II

    petervnhouten:

    “According to Andy Hull at a Bad Books concert in Phoenix on October 12, 2012, this song is about Peter the Great (the Russian tsar). Apparently, Peter discovers that his wife Katherine has been cheating on him, so Peter has her lover beheaded. He then has the man’s head placed in a jar to preserve it, and as punishment, Peter forces Katherine to spend some time each day staring at the head in the jar. This song is a love song to Katherine, sung from the points of view of Peter and also Katherine’s lover’s head (in alternating verses). Kinda twisted, but a brilliant song nontheless.” 

    Originally my post, but this description is crucial.

    (Source: courtholc)

     
     
  12. 19 plays
    Superhumanoids
    So Strange
    Exhibitionists
     
     
  13. 159 plays
    Regina Spektor
    Don't Leave Me (Ne me quitte pas)
    What We Saw from the Cheap Seats